[rc5] Win32 GUI client is a trojan?

lunaslide lunaslyd at pacbell.net
Tue Nov 4 03:24:21 EST 1997


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At 12:53 AM 11/4/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Excerpts from rc5Distrib: 3-Nov-97 RE: [rc5] Win32 GUI client .. by
>"Haberlach, Adam"@testla 
>> Doesn't matter if rc-64 IS changing passwords.  If they say no, 
>> and they are truly in charge, don't do it.  You'll just piss 
>> them off.  They are in charge of those computers, and unless 
>> you own those computers and pay them to maintain those 
>> computers, you do what they say.
>>  
>> >Don't let people throw around their titles. EVER.
>>  
>> Sysadmin is a title.  The experience and responsibilities that 
>> go with it is much more.
>
>
>ok am I only one just laughing my ass off right now.

Apparently.  That's because you don't seem to know what you're 
talking about.  People who value their jobs do what a sysadmin says, 
whether it's brain dead or not.  Just the way most employees do what 
the're told by their managers, even if the're straight out of 
Dilbert.  I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but that's the way it 
is.

>You are making all these great assumptions about what a sysadmin is 
and
>isn't.  And who these sysadmins are and are not.

It doesn't matter, because it's not your decision.  It's his bosses.

>The fact these guys think that RC-64 is changing passwords sorta 
leads
>me to believe that they are absolute morons or have something 
personal
>against RC5 cracking.

>This is my merriment for the week.  Wonder how many other morons 
will
>come to the cry and defend the sysadmins when they are obviously 
making
>biased and unfounded decisions.

Trollin', trollin', trollin'...

>Stand up for what is correct.  Hell you are standing up to the 
notion
>that the current key lengths are wrong.  Why do you not just roll 
over
>and play good trained person and say no no the current key lengths 
are
>just fine.

What is *correct* is that the company owns the machines and it is 
their perogative whether or not to let you run a program on *their* 
workstation.  The sysadmin is the person in the company that has been 
entrusted to manage the computers.  It is, in the end, their call.

>msew  yeah I am in bad mood and yeah you are getting the brunt of it 
and
>yeah you did deserve every bit of it.  Please think before you say 
such
>silly things as that all sysadmins are great and they deserve our
>respect especially when biased decisions are being made. 

FYI, I am the sysadmin at work, and an assistant at school.  At work, 
I am running the client on *some* machines.  The others aren't 
suitable for various reasons.  It's my call.  Why?  Because I am in 
charge of the machines.  

At school, I told the teacher who serves as sysadmin (i.e., the one 
who makes the decisions), all about the project, how the clients 
work, what it's for, and that it won't affect the performance of the 
computers.  He said "Maybe not."  Not because he didn't understand 
(he's a CS instructor), or because he didn't agree with the goal 
(he's running it at home on his Mac and PC), but because *it's his 
call*.  Be they legal reasons, school policies, unsuitable machines 
for the project (because they are used by many students, in many 
environments and mostly for programming and run in DOS most of the 
time) or whatever, *it is his call*.  He also said that once I get 
linux running on all the machines, and they are hooked up to the 
internet by a T-1, we may be able to run the clients.

I agree with you that sysadmins shouldn't give bullshit reasons to 
users about why stuff is not allowed.  But if you are a user on the 
network, the sysadmin deserves your respect for the simple fact that 
the company hired him to do the job.  If he isn't good, make notes of 
his screw ups and report them to the boss.  You may end a sysadmin 
yourself (god help you :-))

And don't just say "that's bullshit, man!" when he tells you you 
can't run something.  Explain what it is, how it works and what it's 
doing.  Sometimes you'll get a yes, sometimes you'll get a no, 
sometimes the sysadmin will put the client on all the machines.

You can't thumb your nose at the sysadmin.  On the network, she can 
be your best friend ("oh, thank you for going into the backup tapes 
and finding that file I accidentally deleted"), or your worst 
nightmare (was that *your* directory I deleted?  Oh, I'm sorry.  Too 
bad the backup tape from last night 'went bad'.)

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